25-36 Months Speech Questionnaire

Day2DayParenting25-36 Months Speech Questionnaire

Comments 11

  1. jyoti guleria

    Hiii..my 2 year old son speaking 20-25 words… But compared other ..he is slow..we r giving training properly but he is learning own his wish…..when he will speak properly.. He is very active..it is indication of problem.. Or it is normal

    1. Post
      Author
      Day2DayParenting

      Dear Jyoti,

      20-25 words is a great start for a 2 year old. Ideally he should be imitating new words and be starting to put two words together such as “Mommy go” or “big ball”. Continue to offer choices during meals and play to encourage communication. Read books and label the pictures for him. Use music and singing to encourage speech. Focus on imitation of fun sounds such as animal/environmental sounds, such as “the dog says woof woof” or “the horn goes beep beep”. Hold objects near your face when talking about them so he can see and hear what you are saying. If you live in the USA you can contact your local early intervention service provider for a speech evaluation.

  2. Allison York

    My daughter Mariah is 26 months and she doesn’t talk. She grunts and points. She has said one word which was “look” while pointing at the t.v. but everything else os just a grunt. I am very concerned. She’s potty training so I assumed she should be talking by now. My Pediatric docor is tellin me she’s ok and that every child is different and that some take longer than others. She should know sounds, as in What does a doggy say? And her response would be Woof Woof but she doesnt say a word. Please some advice.

    1. Post
      Author
      Day2DayParenting

      Dear Allison,

      By 26 months your daughter should ideally have at least a 50 word vocabulary and be beginning to put words together into two word phrases such as “more milk” or “go potty”. If you are in the USA, I would Google “0-3 early intervention services” for your county/state so that you can request a speech and language evaluation for your child and begin receiving some help in boosting your daughter’s expressive language skills.

  3. Anie

    Hello, my kid is 3 yrs of age. He was born as preterm so he is slow than his peers,we checked with speech development doc. He is not talking mych

    1. Post
      Author
      Day2DayParenting

      I hope you have consulted Early Intervention 3-5 preschool services for your child? By age two, most pre-term babies have caught up developmentally with their peers, so your child would be eligible for help at the preschool level if he has any developmental delays.

  4. Mama82

    My son is 3 yo now but is not talking that much.he utters mama,papa,mita and some few words like dede,no no, tana.if he wants something he will grab our hands.but he can follow instructions like we’ll ask him to say goodbye he will wave his hand instead.he can point body parts.he can give high 5,if we instruct him to dance he will dance,he can march even with hand salute. If we ask him to give hugs and kisses he can. we noticed he can remember things even just instructed once.but everytime we are calling his name its as if he doesnt hear us.he is picky eater as well.he loves music and watches tv very well.he did not crawl and creep during infancy.he seems intelligent.Its just that he is not just talking much.please help.does he have autism?

    1. Post
      Author
      Day2DayParenting

      By age 3 children should be speaking in 3 word phrases. if you are in the USA please consult your local school district’s 3-5 preschool program and ask for a developmental evaluation. Autism is a diagnosis that can only be made my a qualified professional such as a psychologist or psychiatrist. Please consult your pediatrician if you have concerns about autism so you can be referred for the proper guidance for receiving an evaluation. You may want to consult this article for ideas: http://day2dayparenting.com/helpful-strategies-apraxia-speech-late-talking-toddlers/

  5. Kirsten

    I have a question, I am extremely perplexed about something that my 3 year old daughter does. I desperately need some guidance on this, and can’t find any articles that address this particular issue with my daughter. My 3 yr old honey is extremely intelligent. Her language skills are that of a 5 or 6 year old. Her vast knowledge of words and her ability to learn and apply sentence structure married with appropriate ideas and concepts is unbelievable. She holds complex discussions with adults and is very aware of all things around her, how they work, and relate to her and other people. That being said, she does this one weird thing that I cannot comprehend. It extremely perplexes me. She makes up words that she chooses to use instead of the correct ones that she knows already and uses regularly. An example: Someone, other than myself, (because she never does it with me) will say good morning to her. She will respond “Kuki”. I’ll tell her, “Zsa-Zsa… say good morning! That’s not polite.” She’ll smirk and say “Kuki.. meow. Kuki meow” and then smile at them with a side eye. I will have to ask her multiple times to say good morning, and then she will say it. She knows what to say and understands the greeting process, it’s nothing abnormal to her. On another morning, she’ll walk up to that same person and say “good morning! I’m doing … (whatever it is she wants to talk about)” all on her own. It seems like it’s just according to her mood at the moment that she is being spoken to. Or, another example would be if her grandmother calls and I hand my 3 yr old the phone and tell her ” here! say Hi to grandma!” She’ll take the phone, but just smile and not say anything for a while. My mom will be asking her questions and trying to converse with her, but she’ll hesitate to talk. Once I say to her “Zsa-Zsa, talk to grandma, that’s not nice say hi”, she’ll do it again… “boopah, keku”. She’ll repeat that a few time, and only squeak out a “hi” after I’ve admonished her several times and asked her to speak regular to grandma. (LOL) It’s funny, now, in retrospect but, why does she do this?? Please help me!

  6. Kirsten

    I’m sorry.. but to add to my question about my 3 year old daughter’s made up words, she doesn’t just do this with other people. I just remembered that there will be times when we are spending time together, and she’ll pick up her toy or some other thing that she’s playing with and put it in my face and say “peeku .. peeku gushie”. Or, I’ll be cuddling her and showing her affection and she’ll sigh and smile and look up at me and say something weird like “puchu.. puchu …mommy …love you” I will ask her what the words are, and she’ll just repeat them. If it’s an object she’s making up a word for, she’ll repeat the weird word and present the object to me again until I acknowledge that the item is the word that she’s using. She’ll nod and continue with her conversation using the made up word. Mind you, she will know full and well the correct name or phrase for what she wants to say, and will use it often, but sometimes choose to use these other made up words.

    1. Post
      Author
      Day2DayParenting

      Hi Kirsten,

      Your daughter’s language skills sounds completely on target for three, and as you say, you feel she is above average in her language skills. It sounds like her made up words are a fun game for her and they get her attention! Preschoolers love make believe play and making up words can be a form of make believe play. Instead of drawing attention to her made up words, which she clearly enjoys, try ignoring the made up words and only respond when she responds with actual real words. Her pretend words aren’t harming anyone, so it’s probably just a preschool phase. Any behavior that we draw attention to with little kids will most likely make that behavior increase. So even saying “That’s not polite, use your words” gives her attention. I’d try completely ignoring the words all together if you want to extinguish her use of them. Only respond verbally when she uses a real word. She is most likely just a creative little girl who enjoys the extra attention that her creatively made up words give her! I really don’t think it’s cause for alarm.

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