25-36 Months Speech Questionnaire

Day2DayParenting25-36 Months Speech Questionnaire

Comments 4

  1. jyoti guleria

    Hiii..my 2 year old son speaking 20-25 words… But compared other ..he is slow..we r giving training properly but he is learning own his wish…..when he will speak properly.. He is very active..it is indication of problem.. Or it is normal

    1. Post
      Author
      Day2DayParenting

      Dear Jyoti,

      20-25 words is a great start for a 2 year old. Ideally he should be imitating new words and be starting to put two words together such as “Mommy go” or “big ball”. Continue to offer choices during meals and play to encourage communication. Read books and label the pictures for him. Use music and singing to encourage speech. Focus on imitation of fun sounds such as animal/environmental sounds, such as “the dog says woof woof” or “the horn goes beep beep”. Hold objects near your face when talking about them so he can see and hear what you are saying. If you live in the USA you can contact your local early intervention service provider for a speech evaluation.

  2. Allison York

    My daughter Mariah is 26 months and she doesn’t talk. She grunts and points. She has said one word which was “look” while pointing at the t.v. but everything else os just a grunt. I am very concerned. She’s potty training so I assumed she should be talking by now. My Pediatric docor is tellin me she’s ok and that every child is different and that some take longer than others. She should know sounds, as in What does a doggy say? And her response would be Woof Woof but she doesnt say a word. Please some advice.

    1. Post
      Author
      Day2DayParenting

      Dear Allison,

      By 26 months your daughter should ideally have at least a 50 word vocabulary and be beginning to put words together into two word phrases such as “more milk” or “go potty”. If you are in the USA, I would Google “0-3 early intervention services” for your county/state so that you can request a speech and language evaluation for your child and begin receiving some help in boosting your daughter’s expressive language skills.

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